helping bring books to kids

A short while ago, there was a note in Stephanie’s school newsletter about the Scholastic Bookclub. The woman who had been organising and co-ordinating it for the school had decided she didn’t want to do it anymore since her daughter is in grade 6 and will soon be moving on from that school. So they needed someone new.

In a moment of community minded generosity, not to mention extreme bravery, I rang up and enquired about it. Turns out that I was the only fool to do so. I mean that only jokingly, of course.. the fool part. Not the part about me being the only one, because I was.

My motivations here are not entirely non-selfish. Stephanie always wants me to come to excursions or sports days or easter parades (and those are truly the worst). I cannot sit through more years of Little Peter fucking Rabbit bla bla bla sang terribly out of tune and out of time. And having an internal brain paradox as part of me wants to yell at them and remind them it’s not “easter”, it’s completely the wrong time of year, and besides that, it’s another stolen pagan festival. But I simultaneously feel glad that I don’t have the balls for such a stunt, because Stephanie would surely die of embarrassment and hate me forever.

Anyway. I figure that by performing this worthy service to the school, I more than make up for all of those type of events that usually involve other parents and watching children do stuff that I just don’t care about. And also, there’s the books thing. I think that reading is important and I remember having the Bookclub forms from when I was in school and how much everyone loved getting them and getting books. So to be able to fill my quota of school-related duty by helping with something that’s valuable to children is a bonus too. That I can do most of the work at home and that it involves minimal contact with other people: fan-fricking-tastic.

Another random perk I have discovered? They send you thousands (ok, not thousands. but lots) of return envelopes that you don’t need. These can be re-purposed by certain little persons who are right into mail and envelopes.

helping bring books to kids

riddle

Here’s a question for you: what do little girl’s tongues, a hot glue gun and an ice pack have in common?

The answer is that they are all tools I have been using this morning in preparing the invitations for Kristian’s naming ceremony. The little girl’s tongues were used to lick the envelopes before sealing them; the ice pack was used for sitting the wax stamps on before making impressions; and the glue gun is used for melting the wax onto the envelopes.

We ordered some of this wax a month or two ago but this is the first experimentation I’ve done with it. Previously I used the old fashioned kind of wicked wax sticks. I think it will take practise still to get the technique perfected, but I’m quite pleased with how the seals came out. I wasn’t using the ice to start with but I think it makes a definite difference to the quality of the impression.

I want more sealing stamps. I’ve been lusting over the tetragrammaton one for ages but it’s so expensive. :(

riddle